Our website uses cookies so that we can provide a better service. Continue to use the site as normal if you're happy with this, or find out how to manage cookies.
X

Search Results

You searched for
On 3 June over 100 PLA staff on 30 of our vessels ran and marshalled the biggest ever flotilla on the Thames. var int_CurrentGalleryAppletImage = 1; function changeGalleryAppletImage(int_ImageID) { if (document.getElementById('imageGalleryApplet_Image'+int

On 3 June over 100 PLA staff on 30 of our vessels ran and marshalled the biggest ever flotilla on the Thames. This film tells the story of our pageant day; 5 am start, 11 pm finish; over 100 people, 30 vessels. Can't view Flash content? Watch the film on our YouTube Channel here.

Here are some of the best shots of PLA people working on 3 June, helping to run the river pageant safely. If you have more photos, please let us have them so we can add and share them round the PLA. var int_CurrentGalleryAppletImage = 1; function changeGalleryApp


What’s changed? A new byelaw came into force on 1st July 2012, controlling swimming in the busiest part of the Thames between Putney Bridge and Crossness (just below the Thames Barrier) by making it necessary to get the prior consent from the harbour master. To be clear: we have not ‘banned’ swimming over the 95 miles of river that we cover. From Teddington Lock to Putney and from Crossness (roughly the Thames Barrier) to the North Sea the

Byelaw 12.3 PLA's Thames AIS Technical Requirements Specification and Procedures for the Operation of Thames AIS and Person Onboard Reporting System - click here Byelaw 14.2 Personal Watercraft in the Thames Estuary Code of Conduct - click here Byelaw 48 Guidance on Working on Vessels on the F

Piloting vessels on the Thames, overseeing vessels navigating, laying moorings, managing river traffic for events, it’s all part of the PLA’s daily job. At Olympics time there’s more of everything – more vessels coming into central London, more events, additional moorings. Watch our latest film to find out more.

There were a lot of exciting things happening on the Thames in the run up to, during and after the Olympic Games. From the Olympic Torch being carried by boat from Hampton Court to Tower bridge to large numbers of sailing vessels coming to the heart London and traditional Thames events - there was plenty to see and enjoy from the banks of the river./p


Port of London General Direction for Navigation in the Port of London (2016) No. 30 requires that all Reporting Vessels underway between Cherry Garden Pier and Bell Lane Creek shall carry on board an operational electronic keying device capable of activating the special signal lights which signify that one or more Reporting Vessels are navigating or about to navigate through the arch displaying the signal. tb